Flipping Classrooms…lessons at home and homework at school

As I was browsing through Wimp.com as I normally do, I came across a story on a Principal, Greg Green, who was sure that he could make a difference at his school but couldn’t quite put his finger on the change he needed to make.

Being the principal of the school for 12 years and a club baseball coach outside of work, he started to correlate the time he spent with his players and what they did outside of practice to improve their skills. He would send his players home with film of their practices and have them watch them at home. This gave him more time to work on mechanics when he was with them and allowed him more time to fix problems rather than explaining them to his players.

Green decided to put this practice into his classrooms at his school; thus, he flipped a classroom of struggling students as a pilot to compare with an average classroom. The results were the once struggling students now out-performed the average students’ class.

Green was now able to get buy-in from the rest of his staff and by 2011, his entire school had flipped classrooms. He was able to assess that it was not just the technology piece of watching the online module at home and front-loading the information but for the most part the process of the teacher assisting and being available for support in the process of applying the module to the classwork.

The schools failure rate dropped from 35% to 10% in only two years.

Take a look at this article/video of how this change affected Green and his students: http://wimp.com/teacherflipping/

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3 thoughts on “Flipping Classrooms…lessons at home and homework at school

  1. Francine,

    I had read some information on flipping the classroom, but wasn’t sure if this concept would work for all schools. After reading your blog, i am more curious about flipping the classroom, especially when i read results such as the ones Greg Green received in his school.

    Like

  2. Thank you for a great example of why and how this can be an important tool in our classrooms. Just think about the possibilities if we were to get educators to combine these techniques with good presentation skills!

    Like

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